Episode #12: Moleskine vs. Habana

I do a side-by-side comparison to the Moleskine Ruled Notebook and the US version Quo Vadis Habana. The two are roughly similar in size, the Habana is about a half an inch longer and wider. The two most notable differences are the paper thickness and color. The Moleskine is off-white paper, witha 72g thickness. It’s printed and bound in China (outsourced), assembled in Italy. It has 120 sheets of paper, ruled. The performance of the paper when tested with J. Herbin fountain pen ink (a generally well-behaved ink) is entirely underwhelming.

The Habana has white paper, with 90g Clairefontaine paper made in France, with the journal assembled in the United States. Habanas sold outside of the US are not the same paper as this. The Habana has 80 sheets, and the paper quality entirely outperforms the Moleskine in every aspect. Expect no feather, no bleedthrough, and minimal echo (also known as ghost, or showthrough). There is no limitation to the ink you can use on Habana paper. 

Quo Vadis Habanas are available for $18.75 from The Goulet Pen Company
Moleskine Ruled Notebooks are available for $17.95 from Barnes and Noble.

Link to YouTube for iPhones and full-screen (part 1)

Link to YouTube for iPhones and full-screen (part 2)

Part 1- Side-by-side detailed comparison of specifications

Part 2- Writing comparison with fountain pens

2017-10-06T18:02:45+00:00 February 9th, 2010|Paper Reviews|5 Comments
  • […] since done more detailed comparisons of Moleskine vs. Habana and the Moleskine vs. Webbie to discuss size, thickness, price, and all the other factors that help […]

  • […] since done more detailed comparisons of Moleskine vs. Habana and the Moleskine vs. Webbie to discuss size, thickness, price, and all the other factors that help […]

  • Dan Hargrove

    I loved Moleskines… until I started using fountain pens. I tried a couple different kinds of ink on a Moleskine shortly after purchasing my first fountain pen, and the beading up was so bad I could hardly read what I had written. Do they slather each page up with wax or something? I'm not sure but my own recommendation is to use ballpoints with a Moleskine; otherwise, the results may not be all too good.

  • Usually the issue with Moleskines is that the paper is too absorbent, so it just sucks up the ink and it feathers and bleeds all over the place. But it's pretty widely known that Moleskines are not great for fountain pens.

  • That's really sad. I used Moleskines for 2 years and I had my fountain pen for 1 and I tried it once in a while trying to write as dry and thin as I could to prevent the feathering and bleeding. Hence it is still not that horrible. I am exploring the Noodlers "waterproof ink" as well.