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Monday, September 6, 2010

How important is an ink's name?

I'd be lying if I said that an ink's name didn't affect at least the way I first perceived the color. A name that's unappealing to me initially turns me off from the ink. An ink with a kick-butt name makes me want to try the ink.

Sometimes I'm wrong though.... J. Herbin Poussière de Lune (Moondust Purple) didn't look appealing at all, but the first time I wrote with it I fell in love and it's been one of my favorites since. Diamine Golden Brown sounded nice and pleasant but looks like my son's diaper after after he's squeezed out a good one! Noodler's in particular has some of the most peculiar and perhaps controversial names on their inks. Undoubtedly there are some that won't even use colors like Tiananmen because of political discomfort!

There are a slew of new inks coming out. Diamine has 10 colors, Private Reserve has 2 colors, Pelikan has 8 colors....so what I want to know is how much is your desire for (especially a new) ink influenced by an its name?

14 comments:

  1. For my money, the best and most accurate naming of ink with regard to how it looks on paper comes from German ink maker De Atramentis. The first time I saw Charles Dickens from the famous name series I thought it was exactly like a color the writer would have used. The same was true with many of their inks. Since the J Herbin names are all in French, I don't make a connection somehow, but maybe it's my lack of imagination. Private Reserve has a color called Dakota Red that always makes me think of the red in blankets of the Sioux Indians.

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  2. An ink's name needs to tell me what color it is. Diamine's Blue-Black sounds like a blue-black. Caran d'Ache's Amazon sounds like a green. I don't care what you name a turquoise I'm not buying it.

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  3. De Atramentis ink names, other than their standard inks, do not tell me anything. Naming an ink Business II, Mark Twain, or Paris is dumb.

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  4. ...would a rose by any other name not smell as sweet?

    I kid! I'd agree that a cool name does draw me to an ink, but also raises my expectation so that if it turns out to look like garbage I can't help but mourn the waste of a kick-awesome name.

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  5. I'm with Sidney; names that don't give me a clue as to the color drive me nuts. I suspect the marketers think names that are edgy or coy make one curious to look at it, increasing the likelihood that one will buy; for me, it just means I move along to the next possibility.

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  6. See I am one of those people that the name draws me in. I like a lot of Diamine colors. Pumpkin is nice. Spearmint is alright. However because of their names I really just am not that excited. Now Noodler's Aztec Fire. Wow. What a name and sure enough I can see the varying colors of flame in the ink. The J Herbin's I love. I don't speak french but Rouge Hematite? That sounds sexy. I am a rmoantic and love to write. So for me the name must almost convey emotion.

    However if it does have an intriguing name. Noodler's Hellfire. Ok this conjures up images of a nice flaming red or orange more like Aztec Fire. the danged thing is PINK. lol

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  7. Sure, if it has a catchy name which I can identify with a pleasant (to me) color, it'll be more likely to get an early look.

    Having said that though, I'm anxious to try out a couple of the new Pelikan Edelstein inks and their names aren't particularly catchy although they appear to be reasonably color descriptive looking at the German web site.

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  8. While selecting an ink, I usually have a list o my mind and just focus the needed colors. So, if I'm loking for a blue-black, I scan the blue blacks of the various brands and the name issue don't play a role in this situation for me. But a flashy name can turn my attention to a not needed item. It's difficult to explain, sometimes examples are best. on my last purchase I bought J. Herbin 1670 and for most of us it is one of the best red colored ink. Since I have a red colored ink, I didn't care the red inks while scaninig the color charts... Until, Noddler's Tianenmen ink got my attention for the name. In the end I bought it :) Noddler's Ottoman Rose and Ottoman Azur also got my attention but thi stime I passed them.

    Just an input for the thread :)

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  9. It bugs me if an ink's name doesn't match the color, if it's an actual color name. Mont Blanc's purple, for example. Violet didn't really match, lavender is even less accurate.

    Apart from that, it doesn't matter to me.

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  10. While selecting an ink, I usually have a list o my mind and just focus the needed colors. So, if I'm loking for a blue-black, I scan the blue blacks of the various brands and the name issue don't play a role in this situation for me. But a flashy name can turn my attention to a not needed item. It's difficult to explain, sometimes examples are best. on my last purchase I bought J. Herbin 1670 and for most of us it is one of the best red colored ink. Since I have a red colored ink, I didn't care the red inks while scaninig the color charts... Until, Noddler's Tianenmen ink got my attention for the name. In the end I bought it :) Noddler's Ottoman Rose and Ottoman Azur also got my attention but thi stime I passed them.

    Just an input for the thread :)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Sure, if it has a catchy name which I can identify with a pleasant (to me) color, it'll be more likely to get an early look.

    Having said that though, I'm anxious to try out a couple of the new Pelikan Edelstein inks and their names aren't particularly catchy although they appear to be reasonably color descriptive looking at the German web site.

    ReplyDelete
  12. ...would a rose by any other name not smell as sweet?

    I kid! I'd agree that a cool name does draw me to an ink, but also raises my expectation so that if it turns out to look like garbage I can't help but mourn the waste of a kick-awesome name.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I learned a long time ago that the only way to know the colour of an ink is to put it in a pen you know and write with it on paper you know - names are all well and good, I prefer one that gives me a clue - that said I love inks (such as the De Atramentis inks) where the name makes you think.

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  14. I completely agree, you don't really know an ink until you try it. It's sort of like wine that way, you can name it and describe it all you want, but you have to trust your own experience to really get to know and appreciate it.

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