Why do you write?

My mother-in-law asked me a question that I often get: who are your customers/followers and what do they use all this special ink and paper for? So tell me.

2017-10-11T13:37:04+00:00 September 10th, 2010|A Goulet Life|19 Comments
  • I don't do a lot of personal writing…I am still stuck on Facebook and email for that.

    However I do include (much like yourself) a hand written note with every pen I sell. I guess the paper and ink don't really mater that much to my customers but it is fun to experiment. I have always had an office supply addition since I was a kid.

  • As a pastor, a primary part of my work involves teaching – sermons, bible studies, blogging, etc. Preparing things that I will teach on typically involves some writing by hand at some point in the process. Writing by hand for me helps with thinking things out more so than if I simply typed things out.

    However, I still use a lot of technology in the writing/thinking process. I usually do a lot of research for sermons using bible software, but the final sermon I actually write out by hand (using a fountain pen in a Rhodia Webbie). Teaching or blog stuff, I typically write out by hand first, then edit into final draft in a word processor.

    At some point in the process, part of my thinking involves the flow of fountain pen ink on a good piece of paper.

  • jjdeal

    Well, I write in a journal every day, probably 3-5 pages. It is diary stuff, stream of consciousness, and whatever else the heck I want!!! I also write REAL letters to a number of friends and family members. Sometimes (not as much as I'd like) I write one or two page essays in a separate notebook I keep for that purpose. While I use computers as well (and have to for my work), I generally draft nearly everything by hand, then take it to the computer.

  • Sam

    I write for several reasons, chief among them to clarify and order my thoughts. I'm a sys admin by day, so I am constantly juggling a zillion things that need to get done. I write them ALL down, and cross them off when complete. My to do lists serve as small trophies of accomplishment. Plus, no digital capture device is as ubiquitous and reliable as pen on paper. The battery never goes dead in my notecard.

    The bulk of my writing, however, is journaling. The way my brain is wired, I have to talk through things in order to understand them. To spare my dear wife hours of ranting and mental stumbling, I "talk" to my journal. It's stream of consciousness mostly, but thats' how I learn and gain deep understanding. It sounds crazy, but it's like a silent dialogue with myself.

    Lastly, I write simply because I enjoy the tactile experience. I'm a somewhat artistic person who used to paint a lot as a kid. I took watercolor classes for a while and really loved it! With my discovery of fountain pens (thanks Brian!), writing reminds me so much of painting– it's like painting words, and I just love it! The physical experience is soothing to me, and very refreshing after spending most of day saturated with extreme high tech work. It's like a mental glass of ice water.

  • To steal from time some sign of permanence.

  • I'm a university student. I use my pens/inks to take notes. Almost everyone uses a laptop to take notes. I have a laptop too, but I refuse to use it to take notes. For if I did, my pens would be dead. It'd be more convenient to be able to search for terms in a digital note pad, but writing with a good fountain pen and favorite ink is really enjoyable. I love the feel of paper through my nib, as well as the color and shading of my ink.

  • I use my pens supplies at work. Not on anything that I turn in. It is all mine!! I am immersed in technology. A true technophile. However I am a romantic. The tactile experience I get from writing makes me happy. I write a letter to my parents every week that they enjoy even though I call them frequently. I usually write a love note to my wife every day. Tell her how much I love her and am lucky she chose me. I write because I must. I have a desire to see my words. To see my thoughts. To know that my son might one day discover something I wrote. Something that can be passed along. When you write, the words take on life. A person that finds a printout or a text message will read the message. However one day when one finds a letter written in flowing cursive or perhaps Copperplate. Well then they shall wonder. I know what your mother in law means though. Who buys this stuff. My mother thinks the same thing. After all they are a different generation. They used it in school. They have only the memories of the ruined essays and the destroyed clothes. lol

  • I write to give me an excuse to use my fountain pens, but I have found that returning to writing has opened a whole new world. I'm met a ton of wonderful people and even rediscovered the creative side of myself that I thought was forever lost.

  • Mike

    I write because I love to watch the ink appear on the paper as I write. I use the cheapest fountain pens imaginable, but the experience is pure enjoyment. I find no such enjoyment in electronic forms of communication– I've never owned a cellphone or belonged to a social networking site, and use email only because it's the only way most people will keep in touch with me.

    I finally made a decision to once again hand-write my correspondence, and have found that, not only do I enjoy doing it, but people seem to enjoy receiving hand-written correspondence.

  • I'm like Mike. I love to watch the ink flow onto the paper. I get so engrossed in it I will sometime use my magnifier light to look through while I'm writing just to see the letters forming in the ink. I may as well be taking a wowwee zowwee drug, writing is my addiction and has been for nearly 50 years.

    I've recently gone back to college and am having a blast not only with the social interaction with young folks but with my fountain pens and inks for note taking. One teacher even collects class notes which is a percentage of our grade. I've had searches for just the right color inks to code my classes. Green for Sociology and a blue-black for Classical Humanities. Noodler's Sequoia (waiting for Warden Series Green Gator) and Bad Belted Kingfisher (thanks, Brian)is joining Henry Hudson Blue . Great excuse for new inks. :>)

  • I love ink and pens. I always have loved them. I bought my first fountain pen when I was a kid on a whim. Even now when I run across old papers I can tell instantly that the dusty blue ink came from my pink and purple fountain pen. Fortunately or unfortunately, I'm known at my job for having all the best office supplies which means they wander off frequently. It gives me a great excuse for buying new stuff.

    I love Clairefontaine paper even though it often smears on me. When I was in Paris, I became hooked. I used these felt tip pens that were everywhere in Paris and never smeared at the time. Now I use fountain pens and don't care that they smear. I can still read it and the ability to use so many colors always makes up for the occasional lefty smear.

  • I love writing instruments. To use a fountain pen is a way of life for me. It is a fine way to be different of the rest of people.

  • Anonymous

    I write a lot as priest in a congregation. I use fountain pen and ink to write in my common book those things/events that need to be recorded. I also use ink to write notes of all kinds (thank you and birthday) to visitors and to our membership. I hope it conveys that what I put down is important to me and that the words mean what they say.

    I use a ton of technology in my position but I believe my personal correspondence to be just that, personal.

    Fr. Greg Pickens

  • I think that I love to use a pen and ink for the simple matter that it is a connection to a more personal time before the interwebs took over all the communications. I like the process of writing with ink and pen. I like that it takes my mind off other more pressing things and gives me a personal ritual that adds more meaning to what I write than a keyboard can ever do.

    Just think if everyone still hand expressive handwriting skills those stupid emoticon smiley faces things would never have been invented!! ­čÖé

    I also think that paper and ink are something we should all hold onto. The invention of moveable type used to print INK on PAPER brought humanity out of the dark ages and made knowledge available to everyone.

    Long Live Printed Books and Pen and Ink

  • Amy

    Everything and anything. My daily writer is a Waterman 94, and I love colors…so I have quite a collection of inks. I have beautiful waxes and scrapbook papers for envelopes and dipping nibs galore.
    But, paper is my love. I have stacks upon stacks of personal journals, and paper and notebooks dedicated to everything you can think of – grocery lists, to do lists, finances, classwork, pharmacy coding for work, etc…

    Needless to say, you take in a good bit of of my household income monthly ;-).

  • Amy

    Everything and anything. My daily writer is a Waterman 94, and I love colors…so I have quite a collection of inks. I have beautiful waxes and scrapbook papers for envelopes and dipping nibs galore.
    But, paper is my love. I have stacks upon stacks of personal journals, and paper and notebooks dedicated to everything you can think of – grocery lists, to do lists, finances, classwork, pharmacy coding for work, etc…

    Needless to say, you take in a good bit of of my household income monthly ;-).

  • I love writing instruments. To use a fountain pen is a way of life for me. It is a fine way to be different of the rest of people.

  • Mike

    I write because I love to watch the ink appear on the paper as I write. I use the cheapest fountain pens imaginable, but the experience is pure enjoyment. I find no such enjoyment in electronic forms of communication– I've never owned a cellphone or belonged to a social networking site, and use email only because it's the only way most people will keep in touch with me.

    I finally made a decision to once again hand-write my correspondence, and have found that, not only do I enjoy doing it, but people seem to enjoy receiving hand-written correspondence.

  • Sam

    I write for several reasons, chief among them to clarify and order my thoughts. I'm a sys admin by day, so I am constantly juggling a zillion things that need to get done. I write them ALL down, and cross them off when complete. My to do lists serve as small trophies of accomplishment. Plus, no digital capture device is as ubiquitous and reliable as pen on paper. The battery never goes dead in my notecard.

    The bulk of my writing, however, is journaling. The way my brain is wired, I have to talk through things in order to understand them. To spare my dear wife hours of ranting and mental stumbling, I "talk" to my journal. It's stream of consciousness mostly, but thats' how I learn and gain deep understanding. It sounds crazy, but it's like a silent dialogue with myself.

    Lastly, I write simply because I enjoy the tactile experience. I'm a somewhat artistic person who used to paint a lot as a kid. I took watercolor classes for a while and really loved it! With my discovery of fountain pens (thanks Brian!), writing reminds me so much of painting– it's like painting words, and I just love it! The physical experience is soothing to me, and very refreshing after spending most of day saturated with extreme high tech work. It's like a mental glass of ice water.