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Friday, December 10, 2010

Noodler's Flex Nib Pen

Just a couple of quick pics here of the pen that's causing all the hubbub. I'm a TOTAL hack at using a flex nib, it's something that takes some practice. I haven't had the time to practice since they came in....hmmm... I wonder why? ;)

These pics ought to be enough just to satisfy some of your initial curiosity, this is not a full review by any means! Of course there was only one choice when it came time to ink it up. Black Swan, duh.




Now I have a tiiiny bit of experience with flex nibs. I have a Waterman 52 and Mabie Todd Swallow from the 20's-30's, and I have to say that the Noodler's pen is not far off from them. The nib is a different design on the Noodler's pen, it's a 'Nib Creaper' ventless nib that has a slit that goes all the way up into the section, that's how you get all that flex. Here's unflexed:


And flexed:


Unlike the feedback I heard about the first 'test market' of the Noodler's Flex Nib pens, I found these to flex quite easily and without a lot of effort. You definitely need to write slower, and there's a 'sweet spot' on the nib that you need to find by adjusting the angle you hold the pen, but when all's good, it's a pretty awesome little pen. At $14 it's a tremendous value and a lot of fun to use.

What do you think?

9 comments:

  1. Judging by the samples it looks promising. Seems like it's capable of some nice line variation - even if it's not a wet noodle (no pun intended ;)). And for this price it's a steal!

    Thank you for the pics.

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  2. I'd love to know how the nib compares to the Brause Steno, if anyone else in the Ink Noveau Brigade has access to both. (It seems like a pretty good benchmark for comparison as it's also inexpensive, and to readily available that many people -- even non-FP users -- have some experience with it.)

    I'm gonna assume the Brause leaves a narrower line unflexed, but which flexes wider? Which requires more force put on the tines in order to flex?

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  3. Try using a flex nib if you're a leftie, it's even harder to get the right width variation.

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  4. Even though mine is one of the apparently stiffer first run I love it. It's a lot of fun. And, to be honest, it's loosened up a fair bit over the last month and a half or so.

    Definitely two thumbs up for Nathan! A fun pen to say the least! I'll have to get a review up of it sooner or later. :)

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  5. honorless, the Brause steno is a little more flexible than the Noodler's flex nib. The Brause feels like you're writing on butter is so bouncy :) I think in general it's harder to get a fountain pen to flex that easily just because of the feed and everything that 'gets in the way', as opposed to just a straight dip nib. But then I could be wrong, I'm skirting on the edge of my basis of knowledge here!

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  6. Oh, that's cool. I wasn't expecting it to be quite as zero-force as the Brause...I've just never used a flexy FP before at all, so I was curious how it compared to something I'm familiar with. Thanks for the impressions, and for not poking fun at all my typos. (This is why I shouldn't make comments immediately after rolling out of bed.)

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  7. honorless, the Brause steno is a little more flexible than the Noodler's flex nib. The Brause feels like you're writing on butter is so bouncy :) I think in general it's harder to get a fountain pen to flex that easily just because of the feed and everything that 'gets in the way', as opposed to just a straight dip nib. But then I could be wrong, I'm skirting on the edge of my basis of knowledge here!

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  8. Just finding new stuff on your website. In this case 2 years old!
    But can't resist commenting when I see something interesting.
    How do you get your Noodler's flex pens to shine like they do in the photos above?
    My flexies are pretty dull looking.

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  9. Yeah, this one was a while ago! I didn't do anything special to make these shiny, it's probably just the bright lights I had on them to take the pictures. You can actually buff these pens up a bit with relative ease, just using a polishing compound or jeweler's polishing cloth. The material is soft though, and will require polishing on a regular basis if you really want to keep it glossy.

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