Wishlist

Friday, March 11, 2011

Rachel Got A Little Lamy

I've been pursuing Lamy (pronounced "Lommy") for months with emails and phone calls to no avail. This past weekend, Rachel casually contacts them. Four days later, we have Lamy at our doorstep. In the same weekend, she casually contacted another brand (we'll be releasing that soon enough, don't worry), and that is in the works as well. I'm going to let her handle things from now on! ;)

Anyway, thank Rachel for her great work. We now have Lamy, which has been one of the brands most requested by our fans and customers. I'm thrilled because we get questions about them all the time, and now I'll know what the heck I'm talking about. We're still learning the brand and finding what we should carry, so let us know if there's anything in particular you'd like to see.

I found a few hours somehow and took some new pics of the pens, enjoy!

Lamy Al-Star- brushed aluminum, really nice! First thing I did was set aside a blue one for myself ;)



Lamy Safari- same style as Al-Star, but plastic instead of aluminum, and grip is not translucent.


 Lamy Vista- same as Al-Star and Safari, but in a clear demonstrator.


Lamy Joy- italic (calligraphy) pens, same as all the others except for the body, which is long and tapered (still posts, though).


Spare Nibs- one of the coolest things about these pens, the nibs are all the same and are all swappable.


I know sooooo many people are huge fans of these pens, and for good reason. We're happy to finally be a part of the conversation going on about these pens.

**Since this original post, I've since done a video on how to replace the nibs of Lamy pens using only scotch tape, check it out here

What's your experience with Lamy pens?

113 comments:

  1. I like my Lamy's, has two of the Safari (one blue, one white - which isnt that practical as the ink shows really good on the plastic).

    But they are for real good pens for the inexpensive price.
    I use an F-nib on my blue, and that is so nice.
    For my white, I use and EF-nib, which isnt that smooth at all. I have to make the ink come out by twist the converter inkholder. :/
    But when the ink is running, it writes very thin and nice.

    But I would say its a good buy. :)
    The blue Al-Star looks so nice! I understand you put one aside for yourself. :)

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  2. I have a stainless Studio, four Safaris, and a variety of nibs. That will change to five Safaris if I can ever get my hands on a 2008(?) lime green one. I much prefer the Lamys to the more expensive pens Hubby keeps buying me as gifts. :)

    The Safaris aren't indestructible but they take a licking and keep on ticking. They write the first time, every time, no matter what ink is used, unlike some of my finickier pens that will only run on Waterman Florida Blue.

    The warm yellow Safari with black clip and nib caused my fountain pen obsession. I blame it all on Lamy.

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  3. I'm thrilled that y'all have scored Lamy. From a business point of view, I'm sure that will work out well.

    Personally, I'm not a fan. Over the years, I've owned two Studios and a Safari and have been disappointed with both. The nibs are REALLY stiff. No give at all. Also, the EF nibs just ... aren't. I've tried EF, F, and M and couln't tell much difference. I also tried some of their italic nibs and found that the feed couldn't keep up with the broad nib, so the pen kept running dry.

    I like Lamy's designs, so I really wanted to like their pens (which is why I kept on trying, even when disappointed), but I find their form far better than their function.

    This is sounding like a rant, which wasn't my intent, but you did ask about our experience with Lamy. Still, Lamy enjoys a very good reputation within the fountain pen community and I think it's great that they are going to be working with you. Lamy has a lot of fans (as do you), and I know this will make them very happy.

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  4. A Lamy was the pen that first drew me into the world of fountain pens (hence my "Lovemylamy" user name on FPN. While they're no longer my daily workhorse, I still like them (and have them in multiple colors for doodling -- ink color matches pen color, yes, I'm a nerd). I recommend them to people who are curious about using fountain pens (but don't want to get a second mortgage to afford one).

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  5. A Lamy is a good pen and inexpensive to boot. I recently got a demonstrator (f nib). It works first time and every time. The fine nib is fairly fine and if I turn it upside down its very fine.

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  6. That's great! What's the widest italic nib that can come with those?

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  7. Way to go Rachel! And congrats as you grow your business. Haven't tried one but now that I have the right people to buy one from I'll be getting on board!

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  8. Excellent!!! I kind of figured one of the new brands was going to be Lamy, with Brian's "attempt" at taking a Z24 converter apart the other night :)

    That Blue Al-Star is on my radar as well.

    Congrats Brian and Rachel.

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  9. Great news! I love Lamys. I have 2 Safaris, 2 Al-Stars a Studio and a cp-1 with a gold nib. I love the 1.1 nib best of all the nib sizes and I switched the stainless steel nib section of my Studio with a black matte section for better grip on my Studio. Love the interchangeability of the Lamys. I hope Brian gets his hands on some 2K Lamys, they are next on my buy list.

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  10. 22 Safaris/Al-Stars and counting, so yeah - I kind of like them!

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  11. yes! my favorite everyday pens. have 6 or so of them. good job rachel! sometimes you just need a ladies touch to get things done no? :)

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  12. @Brian Gray the widest is a 1.9.

    I love my Lamy pens! The italic nibs are awesome! I have them on all my Safaris and Al-Stars.

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  13. I have 3 Safaris and found them a little boring in terms of writing performance. Then on a whim, I put a 1.1mm italic nib on one. Suffllice to say, I really enjoy it now. I think it outperforms the Pelikan Script 1mm and I find its styling more suitable to my tastes and welcome in a business setting. There's two more things to add to my next order. I'm just going to mail my next paycheck to the GPC. :)

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  14. A yellow Safari was my first proper C/C pen bought as an adult (not too long ago) and I definitely picked a good place to start. Not only are they tough, comfortable and well balanced, the fact that you can swap nibs means it's easy for a beginner to get a feel for their preferred width (with the proviso that even the EF really isn't *that* fine, of course).

    Plus if you want to learn to smooth and grind nibs, you can buy a handful of replacements to practice with and don't have to worry about ruining anything expensive.

    I never really got on with the Al-Star that I bought afterwards, I didn't like the balance and feel, but I gave it to a friend who seems to love it, so no harm done.

    The Safari is still the #1 pen I would recommend to anybody who said "I like the idea of getting a fountain pen but I don't know where to begin". They do release LE colours, too.

    (If you're looking at expanding the range of Lamys you carry, the 2000 is definitely a good next choice.)

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  15. So now we know one of the two new lines that GPC is carrying...

    My guess for the other is Pilot.

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  16. Wonderful! I love my Joy and Vista Lamy pens and use the italic nibs exclusively. The Vista is my travel calligraphy pen.

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  17. I have two EF Safaris and the 1.1 Joy. Lamy's EF are more like a fine or even a medium in some other Japanese brands. I prefer a very fine line and that is my only disappointment with them. But they work so well and flow so nicely that I still ended up buying a second EF Safari. You can turn them upsidedown to get a finer line. Works okay and smoothly that way with one of mine, but not the other one.

    The Joy--is a joy! The 1.1 is thin enough that I can still write letters with it and I love that the cap snaps on the end.

    Easy to use converters, too. I am happy to see you will be carrying them. :)

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  18. OH--and I use a Safari for sketch filled with bulletproof Noodlers ink! If you make sure it is dry you can paint with watercolors right over the drawing lines with no bleeding. The Safari (which is the only one I own) works well for sketching and you can move the pen every which way without scratching or catching.

    P.S. The new fist pounding Noodler's looks most interesting for ink and watercolor sketching! ;)

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  19. I've used Lamy a Safari F and Al-Star M as daily writers since my Sailor 1911 XF gold nib disappeared in November 2010 (I was on a tight budget at the time). Since then I've been consistently impressed with their construction quality and underwhelmed by their performance.

    Both nibs write like nails and frequently dry out on up strokes--drying has nothing to do with the ink used. They balance okay but are top heavy. I wrote with about twelve Safari's and nine Al-Star's before purchasing one of each and probably wouldn't have been happy otherwise. Personally I find them lacking enough balance and nib sensitivity to notice but not to stop using them. They'll certainly be shelved once the Edison Nouveau I ordered arrives.

    I agree with @cubic that they're good starter pens and priced right for that market. Otherwise I'd recommend buying Preppy's till you can save for something better.

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  20. OH--and I use a Safari for sketch filled with bulletproof Noodlers ink! If you make sure it is dry you can paint with watercolors right over the drawing lines with no bleeding. The Safari (which is the only one I own) works well for sketching and you can move the pen every which way without scratching or catching.

    P.S. The new fist pounding Noodler's looks most interesting for ink and watercolor sketching! ;)

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  21. Wonderful! I love my Joy and Vista Lamy pens and use the italic nibs exclusively. The Vista is my travel calligraphy pen.

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  22. So now we know one of the two new lines that GPC is carrying...

    My guess for the other is Pilot.

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  23. A yellow Safari was my first proper C/C pen bought as an adult (not too long ago) and I definitely picked a good place to start. Not only are they tough, comfortable and well balanced, the fact that you can swap nibs means it's easy for a beginner to get a feel for their preferred width (with the proviso that even the EF really isn't *that* fine, of course).

    Plus if you want to learn to smooth and grind nibs, you can buy a handful of replacements to practice with and don't have to worry about ruining anything expensive.

    I never really got on with the Al-Star that I bought afterwards, I didn't like the balance and feel, but I gave it to a friend who seems to love it, so no harm done.

    The Safari is still the #1 pen I would recommend to anybody who said "I like the idea of getting a fountain pen but I don't know where to begin". They do release LE colours, too.

    (If you're looking at expanding the range of Lamys you carry, the 2000 is definitely a good next choice.)

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  24. I have 3 Safaris and found them a little boring in terms of writing performance. Then on a whim, I put a 1.1mm italic nib on one. Suffllice to say, I really enjoy it now. I think it outperforms the Pelikan Script 1mm and I find its styling more suitable to my tastes and welcome in a business setting. There's two more things to add to my next order. I'm just going to mail my next paycheck to the GPC. :)

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  25. yes! my favorite everyday pens. have 6 or so of them. good job rachel! sometimes you just need a ladies touch to get things done no? :)

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  26. Excellent!!! I kind of figured one of the new brands was going to be Lamy, with Brian's "attempt" at taking a Z24 converter apart the other night :)

    That Blue Al-Star is on my radar as well.

    Congrats Brian and Rachel.

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  27. Way to go Rachel! And congrats as you grow your business. Haven't tried one but now that I have the right people to buy one from I'll be getting on board!

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  28. I'm thrilled that y'all have scored Lamy. From a business point of view, I'm sure that will work out well.

    Personally, I'm not a fan. Over the years, I've owned two Studios and a Safari and have been disappointed with both. The nibs are REALLY stiff. No give at all. Also, the EF nibs just ... aren't. I've tried EF, F, and M and couln't tell much difference. I also tried some of their italic nibs and found that the feed couldn't keep up with the broad nib, so the pen kept running dry.

    I like Lamy's designs, so I really wanted to like their pens (which is why I kept on trying, even when disappointed), but I find their form far better than their function.

    This is sounding like a rant, which wasn't my intent, but you did ask about our experience with Lamy. Still, Lamy enjoys a very good reputation within the fountain pen community and I think it's great that they are going to be working with you. Lamy has a lot of fans (as do you), and I know this will make them very happy.

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  29. I have a stainless Studio, four Safaris, and a variety of nibs. That will change to five Safaris if I can ever get my hands on a 2008(?) lime green one. I much prefer the Lamys to the more expensive pens Hubby keeps buying me as gifts. :)

    The Safaris aren't indestructible but they take a licking and keep on ticking. They write the first time, every time, no matter what ink is used, unlike some of my finickier pens that will only run on Waterman Florida Blue.

    The warm yellow Safari with black clip and nib caused my fountain pen obsession. I blame it all on Lamy.

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  30. Cesar T. Garcia RamirezMarch 11, 2011 at 1:32 PM

    Before my TWSBI, they used to be my main workhorse pens. Now I have two that I use as lender pens for students who forget to bring a pen or who have a serious case of the death vise. Hopefully this will pull them into the world of fountain pens.

    I know some people dislike the design of the Al-Star and Safari, but I actually like it. They have a good grip area and can teach you to use the tripod grip properly. One of the advantages of the Al-Star is it's lightness. On the other hand, compared to the Safari's AB plastic, they do ding quite easily as I've experinced from having them in my satchel or by accidental 3-feet falls.

    Depending on your experience regarding customers spending habits on pens, you might consider stocking up on the Lamy 2000, too, Brian.

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  31. This is definitely a good brand for you to carry. It's very popular and moderately priced. And I hear that the pens are reliable and sturdy, as well as easy for beginning fountain pen users to learn with. Lots of color choices and interchangeable nibs too - always good things, IMO.

    However - I have no personal experience with LAMY pens, for one reason. It may sound silly, but I just don't like their modern squared off look and the 'paperclip' style clips. I want to like them because I have heard such good things. But their style just isn't for me, and a big part of the reason I use fountain pens is for the way they look. (ah, vanity! lol)

    But I would definitely buy a LAMY as a gift, for the reasons above. They sound like great pens if the look suits you.

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  32. Back in school I used a white Safari, I loved this pen! In the eternal war of Lamy vs Pelikan (in German schools, where fountain pens are mandatory) I always thought my trusty Safari was a clear winner.
    Today I have Lamys, because I still think that Lamy is beautifully designed and a wonderful writer. I love the interchangeable nibs.

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  33. A war, huh? That's so interesting! I can only wish for a fountain pen war here in the US! In my opinion, Lamy has Pelikan beat in the under $50 range. I've used Pelikano's and Safaris, and Safaris are nicer IMHO. Both are pretty good pens, but Pelikanos are getting harder and harder to stock in the US now due to US regulations (since they're products marketed to children). Lamy is a pretty clear front runner. But in the $100+ range, Pelikan has a good foothold with the Souvrän line.

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  34. Big congratulations on offering Lamy. The pen that started my madness...err...enthusiasm is a Safari Vista. It was the perfect beginner pen because it just plain worked, no fuss, no break-in, no skipping, easy to grip correctly. I plan to give some as gifts this year, and now I know where I'll be purchasing them.

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  35. One thing you should look into is the black nibs that lamy has available for their pens

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  36. I love Lamys, I have several in this series as well as other styles. The Vista always gets noticed. And I love they way they molded in the cutouts, usually used to view the remaining ink, but rather superfluous for a clear pen!

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  37. http://www.fountainpennetwork.com/forum/index.php?/topic/25049-how-is-lamy-pronounced/

    How is "Lamy" Pronounced? FPN had a long discussion about it.

    I think they are right, even if the US distributor say it like Lamb-y. Pronounce Lah-mee, like (Sa)lami.

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  38. Get Rachel to ask for the Nexx and Nexx M models. They aren't sold in the US, but maybe she's on a hot streak!

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  39. Both my 90s Safari and brand-new Al-Star are smooth writers, comfortable in the hand, and trouble-free. Swapping a nib is incredibly easy, though it can be a bit messy if the pen is inked. Glad you were able to become a vendor. Go, Rachel!!!

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  40. If you had this two weeks ago I could have bought my Safaris from you.

    Will you be carrying the LH nib?

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  41. Yeah, the Al-Star is nice! I'll likely be talking a lot about the differences between Al-Stars and Safaris....as popular as these pens are, they still confuse a lot of folks. Thanks for letting me know about your experience with the EF nib. Anyone else's like this?

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  42. Lamy's are gateway pens, for sure! You aren't the only one...

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  43. I appreciate your perspective, Ron, even though you've had a less than ideal experience with the pens. I personally haven't had the best of experiences either. I had a Joy with a bum nib and a Vista that I lost! But everyone raves about the pens so much I wanted to give them a shot. Like any pen company there are sure to be some lemons out there, and Lamy's wouldn't be as popular as they are if all the pens were lemons!

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  44. Yeah, Lamy's are pretty much the pens to recommend for a newbie. There's nothing else with as many color and nib options in that price range.

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  45. Also, I forgot to add, the nibs are definitely nails (they are really stiff). That's not great for some, others love them! To each his own.

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  46. This is a lot of what I hear, that they're just flat out reliable.

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  47. There's a 1.1mm, 1.5mm and 1.9mm!

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  48. Happy to help ;) At least they'll be on your radar now. You'll see now how many bloggers use them in their reviews, they're everywhere!

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  49. Actually, the attempt at taking apart the converter had nothing to do with it! My friend Sam (a big Lamy fan) visited the weekend before and showed me his trick to taking it apart (which I wasn't able to emulate, darn it!), and I wanted to share. Of course all I ended up doing was making myself look like a fool! Dah, oh well. I'll play with it some more and put out a 'real' video on it. It is kind of a bear to do, though.

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  50. 2K's are definitely on our radar!

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  51. Wow! That's quite the collection. Do you have a pic?

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  52. What can I say? Rachel just got the job done ;) She's amazing!

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  53. Thanks for clearing that up. You beat me to the punch! Yes, it's 1.9mm.

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  54. Haha! Maybe we should set up a direct deposit? j/k! It'll be interesting for me to do a head-to-head Joy vs. Script. The one thing Lamy definitely has up on Pelikan is that you can buy the nibs separately. The nibs on the scripts are swappable with the Pelikanos (just like the Joy nibs with the Safari/Al-star/Vista), but you have to have both pens to do the swap. Of course, the Script is under half the price of the Joy too...

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  55. The thing to keep in mind with the nib sizes is Lamy is a German company. German nibs in general run broader than their Japanese counterparts. Pelikan is the same way. A Lamy EF is like a F (or maybe even M) in a Sailor or Platinum. That's of course a bit of a generalization, but as a rule, a Lamy EF will only be but so fine.

    They are into the LE thing. Not just for Safaris but Al-Stars too.

    Yup, 2000 is on our radar.

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  56. I can neither confirm nor deny....

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  57. That's one thing I love about these...I love calligraphy nibs but the Joy isn't so practical for travel. But throw an italic nib on the Safari and you're all set!

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  58. I'm mixed on the converters....I do LOVE how the snap into place, that's awesome. But they're a bit tough to clean. I'll have to find some tips on cleaning them better and do a vid on that. Any ideas?

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  59. ohhh that sounds pretty awesome! And as far as the Bernanke inks, I haven't tried them in a watercolor use before. I'm not sure how they'd work, it would be interesting to see!

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  60. Going from a 1911 to the Lamys is definitely a step down, I can understand your being underwhelmed. I would certainly say they're a step up from Preppys though, too. Preppys are like dirt bikes, they get you where you want to go but it's not always the smoothest ride. Lamys are Hyundais, good value, pretty good looking, but not many people will really 'wow' over them. Getting into Sailors and Pelikan Souvräns are more like the Mercedes and Lexus....you begin to expect a lot more out of them. It's all about what you want and what you pay!

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  61. Thanks for sharing this. I think the triangle grip is another reason it's a great 'starter' fountain pen, it's pretty easy to use. 2000s....I'm starting to think you all want them?

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  62. I certainly hear where you're coming from. The paperclip style clip, that's funny! It really kind of is! I'm not 100% in love with the clip either quite honestly, but it is incredibly functional. Yeah, the Lamy is certainly a good gift pen. Nice enough to present well, cheap enough to not be gaudy, and lots of colors to sort of personalize the gift.

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  63. The Vista is really cool. It was actually my first Lamy (one of my first FP's ever, actually) before I lost it in the madness of the DC Pen Show. I never did replace it, until now!!! ;)

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  64. Definitely. We're thinking of offering the full range of black nibs on any pen you want. They're so easy to swap, why not?

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  65. Haha, you're right! It's kind of funny that there's an ink window cut-out on a clear pen! Of course it's because they're likely using the same molds to create all the Safaris and to change it wouldn't make sense, it's just kind of funny ;)

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  66. Huh, thanks for that thread. It's not really clear though, seems everyone is kind of guessing. Our rep from Lamy pronounced it 'Lammy', as in Mary had a little 'Lamb-y'. The consensus on that FPN thread seems to be 'Lommy/Lahhhhmy'. It's hard to say, because it's not a real word, it's a made-up name. The same confusion surrounds the pronunciation of Diamine and Herbin. Dia-myne? Dia-meen? Dee-uh-meen? Herb-on? Hair-bon? Hair-been?

    Who really cares? We're all online anyway, it's not like we have to say the name! Joking of course...I'll see what 'official' word I can track down from the folks at Lamy.

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  67. Haha...yeah....that's not going to be easy. We'll see if it's something we can special order but I'm not going to try to get your hopes up.

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  68. From playing with all the pens, it seems like some of the nibs slide out without a fuss, others are a little tougher. We're actually going to look for some kind of tool to make the job easier on tougher pens. Go Rachel indeed!

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  69. We didn't even know we'd have the two weeks ago! Not even one week ago, actually...

    The LH (left-handed) nib isn't something they're bringing in regularly anymore. They will be available to us by special order from Germany, but I don't know what minimum quantity will be required. It would probably take a month or more to come in :P We'll do it if you're interested though.

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  70. I still think that you loosened the ketchup bottle! :P

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  71. Maybe, but actually I don't think so! The lady we talked to didn't recognize my name :( I'll give all the credit to Rachel ;)

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  72. Gotta love Lamy, can't seem to stop buying them, 2000s, studios, safaris, vintage, have a couple dozen. The kids like them, the wife, great to loan out to people to dip their toes in the fountain pen world.
    If only someone could create a flex nib replacement. Please put me down for an aquamarine or two when they become available.
    Haven't had issues cleaning the converters; I fill them half way a give a little shake, rinse, repeat.

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  73. Flex nibs on a Lamy I think would make peoples' heads explode. For the safety of humanity, I don't think it will happen.

    That shake thing with the converter is key...with any converter, not just the Lamy. I think Lamy is a little more prone to 'holding on to' the ink with a normal cleaning, but it helps if you remove the converter, fill it halfway with water like you mentioned here, and shake it vigorously. That'll get everything ;)

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  74. Fantastic, those are great pens! I love my Lamy Swift, and have several other models as well, also a Lamy 2000 fountain pen. ;-)

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  75. In Germany it is always pronounced Lahhhmy, I never heard a different pronunciation, until I heard an American pronounce it Lammy. It took me a good 5 Minutes to figure out, what he was talking about ;)

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  76. I agree, the Souverän line is great and the name is so fitting. However, a Lamy Dialog 3 has it's own beauty, as does the CP1 or the Studio. The last two cost with a golden nib around 100 Euros here, but they write almost as good as my M1000. The 2k is in my opinion a class of it's own. It took me a week, until we were friends, but now it is bliss. Even my mother has one!

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  77. I actually already have mine, but they're pretty terrific pens that Lamy is a bit nuts for not offering this market.

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  78. Doesn't the rollerball body have no ink window? I imagine they could just use that mold, but that would actually bug me. In fact, I think I now know what Lamy will be my next purchase -- I don't have a Vista!

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  79. Brian - Scotch Tape. Put a little piece of tape on the nib, and pull away at a slight downward angle. The nib will come right off.

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  80. A Swift, eh? I'll have to check those out.

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  81. Awesome Matt, thanks for that tip! I'll give that a shot this morning.

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  82. There could be a lot of reasons why it's not offered, none of which have to do with demand for them. I'll see if they're something accessible to us.

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  83. Haha, we are pretty good at butchering European brand names in the US, that's for sure.

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  84. You're right! The rollerball Vista has no ink window, that's so funny! Maybe it's just an oversight, or maybe the rollerballs and fountain pens are assembled in different areas or something and it'd be more trouble than it's worth to switch the bodies. Who knows?

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  85. I'm curious to hear how the Stuido 3 compares to the Pilot Vanishing Point. The two pens are similar in their retractable nibs, anyone tried both?

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  86. It's great that you guys are now selling Lamys. ("Lame-ee"? haha just kidding)
    I might just get a Vista at some point (because I like demonstrators) but nothing else from Lamy. There are so many other pens to try. Honestly, nothing comes close to the $40 TWSBI.

    I hope you'll be selling Lamy cartridges as well. I won't be buying another converter because they are too expensive and my converter has already got ink behind the piston after the first filling. It won't clean even after flushing it 20 times.

    +1 with using Scotch tape for removing the nib. I got all 3 italic nibs and it's a breeze to swap them on the fly. That's a feature that I really appreciate in these Lamys.

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  87. The Vista is pretty cool. I'm always a fan of demonstrators because I like to see how things work. I'll likely be using a Vista in future videos for demonstration purposes (pun sort of intended).

    We aren't planning to stock the Lamy carts right away. We have to buy them in pretty large quantity, so I want to make sure it would be worth us tying up all that money. After all, there are other inks I think we'd be better off getting ;) ;) The converters can be taken apart, though it's not the easiest thing in the world to do. I'll try to figure out a good way to do it and post a vid on it.

    I will say, the Scotch tape trick works like a dream. That's another vid I'll be sure to do!

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  88. OK, if you are CEO (or you and Rachel or co-CEOs) and Rachel is the VP for product lines, there's got to be a position for the baby somewhere. Director of cuteness, maybe?

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  89. Joseph is the entire cuteness department! He doesn't need a staff, he handles all the cuteness by himself ;)

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  90. Do they have black italic nibs?

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  91. Unfortunately not. Really, the reason they have the black nibs at all is for the Al-Star (in Aluminum) and Safari (in Charcoal). Both of these pens have black clips instead of the normal silver color, so black nibs are meant to match. But since the nibs are all interchangeable, you could put a black nib on whatever you want. Black nibs come in EF, F, M, and B.

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  92. Aww man, I have bad timing :) I just got a charcoal Safari EF for my birthday after having my girlfriend order me one from another site. Too bad you didn't have them then, would've much rather have given you the business. When I get a Vista someday, I know where to go! Any plans on carrying the Studio or the 2000?

    Derek

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  93. That's okay, I know we're a bit late to the Lamy scene :P Plenty of other retailers carry them, it's not like they're hard to find. We're really going to emphasize the nib swapping aspect of them, as that's their biggest asset I see.

    The 2000 has become the most requested thing for us to carry next, so that's definitely in our crosshairs. The Studio is as well. Those pens are a little more expensive so it's a bigger investment for us up front, so we'll have to see how quickly we go after them. I don't think it'll be too long though, especially if interest continues to grow.

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  94. Hmmm...Brian is curious about the Vanishing Point. Might this be a hint about the other brand he's going to carry?

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  95. I was just curious as there aren't a lot of retractable-nib fountain pens out there! The Dialog 3 and Vanishing Point are the only ones that come to mind.

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  96. I hope that your next announcement is that you are carrying Pilot / Namiki...

    Yea, I had a few Lamy pens over the years. What can I say?.. The Lamy 2000 is aesthetically very nice, good weight and very interesting design. The problem is that they leak and the nibs are scratchy. Once I bought my first Pilot Vanishing Point, all the Lamy pens I had went bye bye. You just cannot beat the Japanese engineering and quality control. Every Pilot nib I've used (in the $50+ pen range) has been perfect and smooth.

    Having said that, Lamy ink is nice. I love the bottle design and built-in roll of blotter tape.

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  97. I can neither confirm nor deny anything ;) I appreciate your feedback about Namiki/Pilot though!

    I've actually heard a lot of the opposite about the Lamy 2k. Lots of bloggers and reviews on FPN say it's a solid performing pen. Of course, no pen is perfect. I have to agree with you, the Japanese definitely know how to make some pens. But the Germans aren't too shabby either.

    I am excited to get the Lamy ink in. Turns out we were backordered on all of it, so we're waiting for it all to come in. The bottles are very unique.

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  98. I just got my Lamy Vista. I like it. Got EF nib. Write smoothly.
    Anybody know how to disassemble the pen? The ink on my pen got through the feed. I tried to flush old ink out with syringe fill with water. But no avail.

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  99. Can I make a suggestion?

    The Safari Vista with converter looks much, much sleeker with the Z26 converter (with a black end) than it does with the Z24 (with a red end). I know the Z24 is sold as being the converter for the Safari range, but the Z26 fits perfectly and, as I said, in the Vista, looks so much better.

    I don't think the Vista is a demonstrator, they have been around for ages and I see no sign of them stopping - it is simply a clear pen.

    Generally a Lamy Safari is something I recommend to the 10-16 yr old students I have - it is robust enough to withstand being slung in a bag etc and cheap enough to replace if the worst happens - the colour range also appeals to the young!

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  100. You're missing out the main advantage Brian, Disqus does a good job for spam filtering.
    Its the only way I would allow comments on a blog.

    "Works for me" I think is the phrase!

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  101. Direct deposit sounds perfect. Haha.

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  102. Hi Brian!

    I've gotten to the point where I go across links to catch your posts. It's good to have Lamy for Easter. I started with 2000 Italics when they first came out, possibly before you were born. Currently have two BROAD italic safaris. Best things I learned from this post is that Joys post and that nibs are easily changeable. Oh, and I subscribed to "Damn I Wisht I'd Said That" off your blog roll. Many thanks!

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  103. That is great news. When you get the 2000 or the Vista, I will know where to go as well. I've been wanting a 2000 or a Vista, but haven't taken the plunge yet.

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  104. Thanks Dick! I've done a video on replacing Lamy nibs using scotch tape thanks to a suggestion from Matt Schiller in a comment earlier in this very post: http://www.inknouveau.com/2011/03/swapping-lamy-nibs-with-just-tape-video.html

    Yes, that's Andy Sernovitz's blog. He's a hip marketing guy who gets word-of-mouth. Seth Godin is good too, and my favorite is Gary Vaynerchuck. I need to add their blogs to my blog roll!

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  105. Dave, that's a great point. Blogger actually did a pretty good job of that already, I would rarely get spam on here (don't come after me for saying that, you spammers!). But yes, that's just another added bonus to Disqus.

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  106. The Z26, eh? We'll look into that, thanks! We'll of course still offer the LZ24 because I think a lot of people recognize that red converter for the Lamy pens. But offering both (and maybe doing a blog post about the differences between the two) would be ideal.

    Demonstrator is a term used loosely, at least that's what I did here. It is just a clear version of the Safari. I do like it for demonstration purposes, especially because the grip section is clear and you can see how the ink flows through the feed. And yeah, I don't think it's going anywhere.

    I would recommend a Lamy to anyone new to fountain pens, kids or adults. The color range is fun, and the pens are easy to use and generally very reliable. And they won't break the bank. There's a reason they're popular!

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  107. Alex, I have a tip on flushing with a bulb syringe. Is this what you've tried? http://www.inknouveau.com/2010/04/ink-nouveau-22-flushing-fountain-pen.html

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  108. We already have the Vista: http://www.gouletpens.com/Lamy_Vista_Fountain_Pen_p/l12.htm

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  109. I recently got a charcoal Safari with EF nib (before your announement... that'll teach ya to leave us hanging!), and I find mine to be smooth. I've read on FPN of some inconsistency in nib quality, but can't confirm

    Brian, speaking of which, what is the ETA for the EF nibs to be in stock?

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  110. Haha, sorry ;) Yeah, we're backordered on the EF nibs right now, but we're expecting them in the next week or two, we don't have a definite date. We're waiting!

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  111. Haha, I didn't have a choice! We got the pens in only 4 days after making contact with them, it can't happen any fast than that! ;) Don't worry, in the future, Rachel's going to handle all our acquisitions so it'll happen faster, lol.

    No definite ETA on EF nibs, we have them on order. Probably towards the end of March.

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  112. The EF Lamy is so smooth that I this left-hander can easily use it. Of course, I don't have much to compare it to (just a Pelikano Junior), but when I get a third pen (Lamy Vista, but the Al-Star looks too clean and modern to ignore), I will officially be a collector.

    I like the look of the clip.

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  113. Is it possible to get the coffee or ruby red Al-Stars any more or were they limited editions that have now vanished in the wind?

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