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Friday, September 28, 2012

Pilot Metal Falcon 14k Soft Extra-Fine




We just recently started carrying the Pilot Metal Falcons at GouletPens.com, and I was really excited to show you what they're about. Specifically, the 14k soft extra-fine nib, because it's a unique nib that's not available in the resin Namiki Falcon. The whole pen is slightly longer than the Namiki Falcon, which is just enough to allow it to use the Pilot Con-70 converter, which has significantly better ink capacity than the Con-50 that comes in the resin version. It's much heavier, obviously, but very comfortable and well-balanced in use. All of the trim on this pen is plated in rhodium, which I really think looks nice. The design of the nib and its flexibility is the same as you'd expect with the Namiki Falcon, but this particular nib size is only available in the metal version, which is why I wanted to show it off!

Pilot Metal Falcon, burgundy with rhodium trim


Pilot Metal Falcon, burgundy with rhodium trim, comes with a Con-70 converter

I'm not a magician with a flex pen, but I can at least show you enough to get the general idea ;) I decided to let the pen do the talking, this is my first 'silent' video! Let me know what you think.

***I also made this video showcasing all of the Pilot Metal Falcon soft nibs, enjoy!

Write On,
Brian Goulet

32 comments:

  1. Would you consider this to be a flexible pen? I see no instances of railroading, and I am curious to the amount of pressure required to induce this flex (perhaps compared to a Noodler's Ahab or an old Wahl Eversharp Skyline).

    Thanks in advance.

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  2. Just look at that writing, and tell me if that's flexing! Yeah, I would definitely call it flexing. Pilot doesn't market it that way, they call the nib 'soft', but that's pretty dang flexible to me. It's not going to be as flexible as some vintage 18k nibs that were designed for that purpose, but it's about the best modern flex nib pen you can get without going with a custom grind. It doesn't take a laborious amount of pressure, but it certainly requires intentional pressure. You can use the pen as a 'normal' pen, but when you want the flex, well, there it is. This nib/feed design in particular does a really nice job of resisting railroading, a lot of that has to do with writing slow, just like I did in the video.

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  3. No need to call in a professional flexologist--this baby can absolutely deliver line variation like crazy. ;) I have one in Fine, and it's a wonderful pen. Question, though--can you buy just the nib unit in EF? The F works really well as a daily work pen, but it would be nice to have the EF for lettering. Great video! ( And --while you were writing, I kept hearing the music from 2001! LOL)

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  4. Thanks for the reply. I am going to add this to my Christmas list!

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  5. It's... unsettling... we are so used to hearing you talk through your thoughts...

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  6. The reason Pilot and other Japanese pen makers will not market the pens as Flex pens is because they have absolutely no use/need for real FLEX pens when writing Japanese or Chinese characters, but springyness/softness in the nib is a sought out characteristic. Now when these pens are used to write Roman character they do deliver some really nice line variations, and can be flexed however they are not designed for say copperplate writing or the such, doesn't mean one can't use it that way just have to be gentle :)

    EXCELLENT video btw Brian :-) love the jazzy music :-D

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  7. Yes, I believe we can order just the nib units! List price is $140, so our price would be $112. Available in the soft EF through B.

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  8. Thank you kindly, Mrs. G! This is now Item 2 on my Christmas list. (Item 1 was a nice big bag of untraceable bills with Ben Franklin's picture on them. If I get that, Items 2 through 26 are rendered moot. ;)

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  9. I don't like it. looks cheap and is twice as expensive. I like to original falcon

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  10. I think that's VERY impressive. If I weren't left-handed I would get one for sure. I imagine (?) that this is the principle behind the quill pen and the beautiful handwriting of the past.

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  11. Love the silent video for this pen - it really does speak for itself. Question though: is this the Falcon nib that was formerly only available in Japan? Or is it the same as the Namiki Falcon nib?

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  12. I like your spoken videos better than the new silent kind. You're an expert, so I watch these videos to hear the thoughts of an expert.

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  13. Brian can you give us your take on the SEF as an everyday writer? Is it smooth even though the unflexed line size is very small?

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  14. Love the music. This looks more like the flex pens of old. Will the feed keep up to fast writing? I s it smooth?I FDoes it flex easier than the resin version?

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  15. I am new to fountain pens, and I had never seen a converter like that before! I also didn't know you could apply that much pressure to the nib. It freaked me out a little.

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  16. That nib is designed to be somewhat flexible (this is why it's called "soft", I think). You wouldn't want to apply that much pressure to a non-flex nib, or you'd likely spring/bend it.

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  17. Thanks for the additional info here, that makes sense :) I'm glad you like the video, this was a fun one to do!

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  18. Looks cheap? I can assure you that it doesn't look cheap in real life. This is one solid pen. That said, the Namiki (resin) Falcon is still great, and gets you the same nib performance as these.

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  19. Yeah, it's a little tougher for lefties to really take advantage of the flex, I'd recommend a medium nib if you did want to do it.

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  20. The nib here isn't available on the Namiki Falcon (at least in the US, I don't know about Japan). The design of the nib is the same as the Namiki Falcon though, so the fine, medium, and broad nibs perform the same on both pens, the only difference being the rhodium plating on the Metal Falcon nibs that give it that silver color.

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  21. That's good to hear :) I'm not changing my style altogether, I just wanted to try it out. I've done well over 200 videos with a lot of me talking, I thought it would be nice to do something different :)

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  22. It's about as smooth as you can reasonably expect a nib this small to be. The fine nib is actually a little more of a pleasure to use, and gets pretty close to the same variation.

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  23. I'm not very proficient with flexing, so I tend to go slow when I do it. I haven't really pushed it past it's limits in terms of writing speed, but the ink flow has kept up with everything I've tried to write! It flexes exactly the same as the resin Falcon, it's essentially the same nib (except the tip is ground a little smaller on this EF, clearly).

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  24. Oh yeah, this nib is made to handle this pressure. That's why it has the 'soft' designation. Don't try to flex a normal nib like this, or you'll bend it!

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  25. Haha, I guess I'll have to do a follow-up review of the pen with me talking through my thoughts ;)

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  26. Will you be carrying the resin Elabo 2011? It's the same as the metal falcons hence carrying the SEF nib I so desire with a resin body? I use fountain pens mostly for sketching and the lighter body helps over long periods. It's also retailed at cheaper price. That and I'm not much of a gold guy (yay rhodium plating).

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  27. This is the first I've heard of the Elabo...it's not something available to us in the US. :( I found this review from Hong Kong that shows the three different pens together, no affiliation: http://kmpn.blogspot.com/2011/09/pilot-elabo-2011.html

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  28. I got one today. At first I was a little disappointed that it wasn't smooth like the SM nib. However I'm getting used to it. Having a little feedback certainly lends it some extra character.

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  29. I have an odd question, I am already budgeting to get a Metal Falcon, I love my standard SF Falcon, but want a Con-70 sized Falcon. My question is does anyone know if the sections or nibs are swapable between the two models? As that will help me decide if I should get the SEF on the metal or stay with the nib that works... I am a left hander and nibs are often either very nice to me or the worst thing ever. I am constantly shocked by number of people that assume, the nibs I actually favor won't work for me :)
    Thanks


    Tom

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  30. I too would like to know the answer to Tom's question. Brian and GPC team, any thought?

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  31. Alex at Goulet PensJuly 23, 2014 at 2:54 PM

    I'm going to add this to our list of Goulet Q&A questions — I'm not sure the answer but we'll figure it out!

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  32. Alex at Goulet PensJuly 23, 2014 at 2:54 PM

    I've found it takes some getting used to for sure — but I'm also sure you'll be in love with it in no time. If not, let us know!

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