Goulet Nibs

I’m very pleased to announce the introduction of the Goulet #6 Stainless Steel nibs! Made by Jowo in Germany, these $15 stainless steel nibs are available in EF, F, M, B, 1.1, and 1.5 sizes, and have a sweet GP ink splatter logo on them. These nibs are ideal for converting your Noodler’s Ahab (and any other pen that holds a #6 nib) to a non-flexible pen with a good range of nib sizes.

Here’s a quick reference for you to jump to just the part of the video you want to see, since I know I made it really, really long!

  • Backstory of why offering our own nibs is significant to GouletPens.com (0:20)
  • Showing the nibs (8:55)
  • How the nibs write (10:35)
  • Placing a Goulet nib on a Noodler’s Ahab (14:22)
  • Writing with a Goulet nib in an Ahab (19:38)
  • Replacing the nib with an inked-up Ahab (20:10)

These are German nibs, so they’re going to write a little broader than their Japanese friends. They will be similar to other nibs made by Jowo. They are smooth with a hint of feedback, so not quite like writing with a hot stick of butter on a sheet of ice, but smooth enough so that I think most folks will find them quite favorable. You can compare the thickness of each of the writing samples with any of the other pens we stock in our Nib Nook.

  • The extra-fine is fairly thin, not hairline, but thin enough to get the job done. It’ll be ideal for those who want to write as fine as possible. It’ll be about comparable to Lamy, Edison, and other German nibs. 
  • The fine is not a world of difference from the extra-fine, it is a little broader but about the same wetness. The fine will be a solid all-around nib. 
  • The medium is pretty a pretty drastic change from the fine, though. It’s broader, and significantly wetter. If you’re b looking to get the most color out of your ink and want to start seeing some real shading, that’s where you’ll want the medium. 
  • The broad, well, that thing is just a firehose. Use it when your paper is on fire and needs to be doused! 
  • The 1.1mm is going to be better for an ‘everyday’ stub, adding a snazzy bit of calligraphy styling to your writing without having to drastically change the way you write. The 1.1mm and 1.5mm are stubs, so you’ll get line variation between the cross- and down-strokes, but the corners are rounded so they will be relatively smooth, much smoother than a ‘crisp’ italic. Click here to see the difference.  Stubs are a bit less forgiving than conventional nib in terms of how you rotate your pen in your hand when you write, but once you write with them for a little bit, it’s easy to get used to them. They’ll let you know how they like to be held 😉 
  • The 1.5mm is a bit wider on the down-stroke, and something that will be a little bit harder to use with everyday writing, unless you have the room to write larger than normal. 

Each of these nibs is $15, and come as just the metal nib (no feed or housing of any kind). We’re also going to offer them in a set of all 6 sizes for $80, a bit of a discount there for ya 😉 Though they are standard #6 nibs and will fit a variety of different pen models, just be aware that pretty much all pen companies will only warrantee the performance of their pen with their own nibs in them. You are more than welcome to tinker around and swap these nibs on whatever pens you want, but be conscious of your particular brand’s warranty policy before you do so. I have been using these nibs on the Noodler’s Ahab with good results, so that’s my primary motivation for offering them.

I’d love to hear what you think! These are something I’ve been working on for some time, and I’m very eager to see how the fountain pen world responds.

Write On,
Brian Goulet

2017-10-11T03:37:53+00:00 April 3rd, 2013|Pen Reviews|124 Comments