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Monday, February 17, 2014

Pelikan Souverän Special Orders at GouletPens.com



 **Update as of September 2016 - we're currently only accepting special orders on certain Visconti and Namiki pens. Email info@gouletpens.com for more information.**

We carry a variety of brands and models at GouletPens.com, but there are so many more we don't yet have available right now. Pelikan is one of those lines that we've actually been authorized retailers of for a few years (we love their ink!), but we haven't dipped our toes into the high-end fountain pen line... until now.



We haven't completely taken the plunge to regularly stock the full line in our warehouse just yet, as it is incredibly extensive. So in the meantime, we've set up the most popular Souverän series up on our website as special order items, including the M600, M800, and M1000. This means you can add one to your cart and check out as normal, but instead of shipping your order immediately, we'll be placing an order in to the Pelikan distributor to order your specific pen. Once it arrives to us about a week or two later, we'll inspect it to make sure it looks good, even ink it up and test it per your request, and ship out your order in full at that time.



There are still many more Pelikan models available to us, as well as individual nibs units. We're happy to special order any of those as well - just shoot us an email and we'll be happy to get you a price quote. If you have any other questions, just email us or drop a note in the comments below.

 
Are you excited to see us expanding our Pelikan line? What's your favorite Pelikan pen?

Write On,
Brian & Rachel Goulet

16 comments:

  1. Pelikans are definitely in a class of their own. I own a couple of 200 demonstrators, and covet the white tortoise shell edition. I understand the 400 white tortoise shell is out of production, but would you be willing to order the white tortoise shell 600?

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  2. Nice addition to the Goulet lineup! Pelikan pens are amazing! I own several of them, vintage and modern. (No M1000 though.) Picking a favorite is tough, but it would probably be my green M400 with a very smooth and expressive EF nib. Speaking of which, is there a reason you're only adding the larger models to your site? I assume you could special order M400s as well ...

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  3. Not Brian, but I have a suggestion for you...

    I pull the squeezie converter out of the pen and use a syringe (not the bulb kind) full of water to rinse it. You could probably also use a slow trickle of water from your sink. I clean the nib unit using a bulb syringe or just running water (depending on the ink).

    Be sure to fully seat the converter when you put it back in place. Otherwise, ink will end up in the barrel of the pen and you'll have the same mess I once experienced ;)

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  4. Great to see you expand into the Pelikan line - their piston fillers are certainly one of the gold standards in the industry ever since MB became a glitz-and-glamour brand... Born and raised in Germany, my first FP was a Pelikan "Pelikano" (late 1960's version) and it made me a fan of the brand from my 8th year of life. In 1985 I bought my first "serious" pen, a brown/tortoise M400, at that time sans gold rings on the body. It's currently inked up with J. Herbin "Lie de The" which I got a few weeks back from you-know-who (Thanks again for your terrific service!). Along with my L2k's, the Pelikan pistons are my favorites yet (there's another M400 in black and a vintage M140). That being said, I don't care for all the extra gold rings... how about carrying the M205's, and the option to swap the nib for one of those gorgeous 14k M400/600 nibs? I guess that would be my favorite option for another Pelikan! As always, thanks for your good work, and careful selection of product!

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  5. The white tortoise is long gone, too. We did stock that one when it was available, but it must have gone away two years ago at this point. I did shoot a vid on it while I had it, though: http://www.inknouveau.com/2012/02/pelikan-m600-white-tortoise.html


    Sorry!

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  6. Christine has the right idea. I'm a BIG fan of the bulb syringe. Pilot pens are a little weird though, a normal bulb syringe doesn't fit well inside the grip of the pen because of a housing that surrounds the back of the feed, so I actually have one bulb syringe that I cut back to fit OVER the grip of my Pilot pens. Works great that way.


    Daniel, I think you're doing things right you just need to clean it more. X-feather is a pretty saturated ink and is going to take some work to get all the way out of there. The squeeze converter in the Metro is functional, but not the strongest tool for cleaning out a pen. It just takes a lot of flushes.

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  7. Yup, can definitely get m400's too. We didn't get into those yet, no strong reason why. We wanted to dip our toes in the water a bit, and since the m400 and m600 are so close in size, we chose to sit out on the m400 for now. But if that is something we should offer along with the m6/8/1000, then I'll definitely rethink that.

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  8. We did carry the m200/205/215 about two years ago, and they're pretty cool pens. They just didn't sell that great for us though, and they underwent a couple of price increases over the last couple of years that has made them pretty pricey, so we haven't been clammoring to get back into those. Nib swapping on these Pelikans is definitely an option, and the m200/400/600 to all share nib sizes. But boy, stocking all those different gold nibs gets pretty expensive pretty fast, we'd have to think long and hard before pulling the trigger on that.

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  9. I have long been a fan of Pelikan pens. I have an M600 and an M800.

    I went to a pen show just to browse and the salesman talked me into trying the M800 with a broad nib. I told him that I thought my hands would be too small for the M800 as it is quite large and I thought the broad nib would be too wide for me as I always use a medium nib.



    Well what a surprise to me. The M800 was a pleasure to hold, handle and write with. The broad nib exceeded my expectations as it was quite smooth and produced an italic like line which I loved. I bought the M800 and it has never been out of use. The M600 by comparison, now feels very tiny. My wife has small hands so I gave it to her.



    In addition, I have never had any performance issues like I experienced with my Mont Blanc 146 which leaked and about every 2 -3 years needed to be returned for service. The Pelikan pen is heavier and more solid.



    Very highly recommended.

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  10. I own an m205 and a nicer Pelikan is certainly on my list of "someday" pens. I'm glad to know that I will be able to purchase it through my preferred fountain pen retailer.


    If I ever publish the novel I've been writing (with fountain pens, naturally), expect an order!

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  11. Would we be able to special order a M200/205/215?

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  12. My first-ever fountain pen was a Pelikan in the 100 series (120 maybe?) in 1988, while I was in high school -- and at the time, fountain pens were thought of as something for 94-year-old British aristocrats, so I got some odd looks. I loved that pen. I took notes with that all through the last year of high school and all of college, and with it wrote the letters that sealed the relationship with the lady I later married. The barrel eventually cracked--probably due, in retrospect, to my bad habit of carrying the pen in a front pants pocket, which would tend to exert a bending force on it whenever one sits down without taking the pen out. I replaced the barrel (part ordered from Germany) and kept going. Eventually the second barrel cracked, and with the rest of the pen very worn as well, I finally retired it. It's in a drawer here somewhere. It's still the smoothest nib I've ever had on any pen. I've coveted an 800 or 1000 for 25 years, but that expensive dream has never made it quite to the top of the funding priority list. As Waski said, it's good that if I ever want to pull the trigger on that buy, now I can do it here.

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  13. Thanks, I appreciate the advice!

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  14. Got it. Do you know anything about metro nibs and feeds being tighter and harder to pull out before? In your video it looks pretty easy but I pulled as hard as I could and it didn't budge. I assume it gets easier after the first time? Any tips?

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  15. Thanks so much, Brian - yes I fully understand the stocking problem. And I also see the price point situation with the € on the rise... After all, one can get a TWSBI 580 for a mere 50, and an Lamy 2000 for about the same as a Pelikan 215... So the most intriguing feature would be the nib-swapping deal - could you special-order, even perhaps with a longer delay ? (just probing, not pushing... :) )

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  16. Hello Goulet Pens! I do love your company, keep up the great work. I have a quick question about the Pelikan M600. I actually own a slightly older model of the M600 in a medium nib and I struggle a little bit with some slow starts especially on rhodia paper. It's not unbearable and it seems to be temporarily solved by flushing the nib with Goulet pen flush. But within a week or so the slow starts begin again. Is there any solution you know of for this or is my only option to clean it every week? ALSO.. this in no way reflects the quality of the Pelikan nibs. As I stated, mine is an older model and I got it used with no knowing what the previous owner did to it and this is the best pen I have ever used. I hated wide lines and medium nibs and always sought the finest nib available... but this pen has changed that completely. It is very smooth and flexible and obviously a high quality pen. But anyway, If you know of any suggestions to help with my slow starts, I would greatly appreciate it. Thank you!

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