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Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Sheaffer 300: Quick Look



The Sheaffer 300 is a big, heavy pen with a classic and professional look. Whip out this pen in a meeting and you’ll catch some wandering eyes looking over trying to see what you have in your hand. It’s not flashy, but everyone will know you care about what you’re using.





Available in a fine or medium nib (which writes surprisingly smooth), you can get the Sheaffer 300 in several different conservative colors. The gold trim pens have a two-tone nib, which looks pretty nice.




Starting at $75, it's a reasonably-priced pen with a solid reputation, and you can learn more specific details here. It comes with a Sheaffer converter and both a black and blue ink cartridge. Check out how the pen compares in size to other pens in the Goulet Pen Plaza, and see how the writing samples compare to others in the Goulet Nib Nook.

What do you think of the 300?

66 comments:

  1. This pen seems to have an articulated (hinged & spring-loaded) clip. If this is true, then does the cap have a cap-liner to seal-off the nib and feed when it is capped so they don't dry out? This question is critical IMO.

    Some reviews and threads I've seen indicate this pen is assembled in Slovakia of Slovakian parts except for the steel German made nib. But YMMV. The design and parts look suspiciously Chinese to me. It reminds me strongly of a Baoer pen I have with a articulated clip - and NO cap liner. The Baoer is a very nice pen otherwise though; especially for five bucks.

    Reviews say this Sheaffer's pen is quite heavy, likely brass. I'm worried it will be too top-heavy and unbalanced when writing posted.

    Anyone that has a Sheaffer's 300 FP care to weigh in on my cap liner and top-heavy concerns?

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  2. Q. I just bought a Monteverde Prima with a stub 1.1 nib and wanted to swap the nib, but I cannot pull it out -- seems to be in there VERY tightly. Any hints on how to loosen it up?!

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  3. DebS, I have a Monteverde Charisma pen and the nib and feed are friction fit in a threaded housing that screws into the grip section. I unscrew the housing then pull the nib and feed out. They will come out without removing the housing though as they are friction fit. Make sure any dried ink is flushed out and maybe soak the grip section a while to soften up any ink. It may be that they are a very tight friction fit. Be careful, they may not come out like my pen. Good luck. I would first email Brian at brian@gouletpens.com to make sure your pen's nib comes out like this.

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  4. DebS, ignore my reply below, Brian has this information on his web site: http://www.gouletpens.com/Monteverde_Purple_Swirl_Prima_Fountain_Pen_p/mv26950.htm

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  5. sweet! i hope you will start carrying them soon.

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  6. Brian's Fountain Pen 101 was the start of my initial obsession! :0) I agree - Brian is wonderful for sharing all his knowledge!

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  7. That's wonderful. I love the idea of nib sets like the Goulet Nibs. It's a nice way for people to feel like they're getting a deal.

    Thanks for all the wonderful things you guys do. I'm looking forward to what comes next and am waiting with baited breath to find out which pen lines you guys were specifically thinking about.

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  8. I don't own a Lamy or a Pilot for which this would be an issue, but I have considered buying one. While the benefit of being able to order a pen with only an italic nib, for instance, is appealing (and may be a selling point in itself for some people), I find it 100% understandable that it costs more than it's worth on GP's end. As others have pointed out, we have been receiving a free service, and I think some of us have taken it for granted.
    As always, thanks for what you do, and thanks for the heads up about this!

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  9. Ah, I get it now - interesting. Thanks for taking the time to explain.

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  10. I completely agree with your decision. There is no point in keeping high inventory of non-moving or slow moving nibs or products. It eats away into our profit margin. Instead you may introduce system of maintaining healthy inventory of average selling products and for a specific range of product, it should be procured and supplied to your consumer.
    Also you can negotiate with your supplier for stocks returns against new order, this can mitigate some of your woes....
    By the way thanks for your mails by which you share your feelings...

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  11. Brian, You have done two really smart things: 1. You married Rachel, 2. You let her do the talking in this video.

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  12. Rafael EscalanteJune 12, 2014 at 8:38 AM

    It is a sound business decision, and as a frequent client of GPC I fully support it. Keep up the good work!

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  13. Rafael EscalanteJune 12, 2014 at 9:31 AM

    Is there an "I've got a pen problem" T-shirt coming soon?

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  14. So does this mean that vanishing points can only be purchsed with nibs now and no longer just the body?

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  15. This video convinces me more than ever of your dedication to your customers It's clear from your faces how painful this decision was for you. I totally understand, and I'm betting the majority of your customers do, too. The fact that if I want a "Frankenpen", I'll now have to do the nib swap myself, and pay for the extra nib, seems only fair to me. And, I'm confident I can do it with the help of Brain's great videos.

    I (selfishly) want you two to continue to have a healthy business so I can continue to enjoy your great products and service. I'm very excited to hear that cool stuff is in store, and it was great to meet Rachael!!

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  16. Absolutely! We'd be happy to do that, no charge. We do that now with Goulet nibs on Ahabs or Jinhaos. :)

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  17. That all makes sense to me. We'll definitely do some nib multi-packs at a discount, I'm thinking three sets: one for EF-B steel, one for EF-B black, and one for the 3 italics. We should have those up by the time of the switchover. And we'll also have a discounted nib-with-pen-purchase deal going on too. And no charge for nib swaps, as long as someone's buying the pen and the extra nib in the same order. :)

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  18. You're very welcome! Thanks for your understanding. If you ever have any questions about buying a Lamy or Pilot, let us know, we're happy to help in any way we can.

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  19. That would be neat! Levenger inks are proprietary (their exclusive) but we're always on the lookout for new brands. We have a pretty good offering now, but I know we haven't conquered the entire ink world yet. ;)

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  20. Thanks for your support and understanding! Our suppliers have been very understanding and flexible, within reason. I think we'll be able to recover from the overstock in not too much time after making these changes. We have an incredible customer fanbase!

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  21. Hahahahaha, nicely said. I'll take that as a massive compliment. ;)

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  22. That's correct, they will only be available with nibs ongoing, as a complete pen. Never hurts to have spares, though.... you can easily switch out colors, change sizes based on your need, or have a backup in case you drop it. ;)

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  23. Thank you so much! We're really excited about our future, and this will only help make us stronger to keep on growing the way we want to. I have so many cool things in the works that I cannot wait to share with everybody! ;)

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  24. Do you have any ideas for brands you'd like to see us carry? I'm open to any suggestions!

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  25. I know we've already ruled out Sailor, so that's out, but I've heard great things about Visconti. I read a review which spoke highly of their steel nibs, plus they have several interesting ink colors. Then there are The Bexley pens. I'm especially drawn to the Poseidon Magnum II.

    I'd also love to see you guys come out with goulet #5 nibs. I have a baoer and a diplomat which would benefit greatly from some decent nib replacements.

    That being said, with three young children I have to be choosy as to what pens I invest in. Suffice it to say I don't come anywhere near Brian's collection size/value. My wish list has a Pelikan 805 EF Blue, Platinum 3776 UEF in Chartres Blue, Visconti van Gogh Fountain Pen Starry Night F, and a Bexley Poseidon Magnum II F in Blue Lagoon.

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  26. Perfectly understandable, but I do have one complaint. Your graph appears to have been created using computer software, instead of being drawn by hand using a nice fountain pen :-)

    I don't mind buying an additional nib if I want to use 1.1 italic on my newer Safari. I switch the nibs around a fair amount, even when they are inked up.

    I really appreciate the fantastic service you provide.

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  27. Honestly, Frankenpen is a natural-seeming upsell opportunity. I'd pay $5 to have y'all swap my nibs for me (on a new same-time purchase), or pay to have you tune the pen before shipping - I'm not an expert, and I know you guys are. Being able to have an expert install my weird nib choice, test and tune the pen? totally something I'd pay for.

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  28. Hi David,

    there is a white liner inside the cap but I can not see if it really seals everything of. In any case, I have experienced no problems with the nib drying out, even after a few days break.

    Not sure where is it assembled but I can not see any quality issues. I know that Sheaffer runs its own quality control in the Chinese factory so I trust this is ok.

    The pen itself is certainly not heavy, the cap is. This is actually quite weird as there is a ring at the end of the barrel that makes the cap click in place when posted but writing becomes a bit of a struggle with the balance, .even to the point that fast and small writing makes the pen develop a will of its own.
    It weighs in like this:
    Capped/closed 41 g
    Cap 24 g
    Body with converter 18 g
    Body empty 13 g
    Converter w/o ink 4 g

    I never post my pens with some exceptions and all I can say is that this 300 is certainly a very robust and reliable everyday writer. If it needs to be classed, I would put it in the range of (more expensive) Parker Sonnet/Waterman Expert range.



    Write on...

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  29. Thanks erpe, Great information. Yes, this looks like a pen that just isn't going to be easy to use for longer writing sessions when posted - a shame as I usually write posted.

    It is good to hear there is a cap liner. If you want to see if the liner seals the cap, you can blow into the cap and check if any air leaks out. Another way to check is to fill the cap with water and see if it leaks - but I prefer the air blowing method in-case water gets trapped behind the liner and causes parts to rust.

    Thanks again for the information...

    David

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  30. Haha, yep, the magic of Excel. That would have been better to draw it
    out, and I totally forgot to do that before we started recording! Oh
    well, next time we have a graph to show, I'll be sure to use pen and ink instead. ;)

    And thank you!

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  31. Ah, unfortunately Visconti won't sell to us either, because we don't have a physical brick & mortar retail storefront. Same as Mont Blanc. We'll look into the others! We just got in the Platinum 3776 UEF in Chartres Blue, and I know we can special order the Pelikan 805 EF Blue any time. ;)

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  32. At least we have nice work benches. ;) But yeah, totally... I don't think the team is going to complain about not having to spend hours on those tasks anymore. More time available to get packages out the door!

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  33. Haha, well said. Great reasons ;) And happy early birthday!

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  34. I totally agree! After "meeting" Rachel, I'm in love. Totally charming, and a great business mind! I think Brian may have used up his lifetime allotment of luck.

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  35. Sorry the suppliers are putting up barriers and unnecessary rules that affect you.

    I dodn't know about the special order from Pelikan. I thought we were limited by what was on the site. Thank you.

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  36. Yeah, it's not the same as the Targa but I still like this pen. It's a little cap-heavy which gives it some back-weight, which isn't my favorite aspect of the pen but it is unique as most pens don't have that. Some people like back-weight.

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  37. Thanks for sharing erpe, I had intended on inspecting the pen closer when I went in to the office yesterday but got caught up in other things!

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  38. It's really going to depend. Me, I have big hands, so the back-weight isn't a problem as I hold my pen far back enough where it balances out. Smaller hands will feel the back weight more, and it may or may not be comfortable for long sessions.

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  39. It often does, especially if it's a particularly concentrated ink, as they usually have more lubricants added to counteract the dry-flowing dye. Adding water to these inks will dilute the lubricant, making it write drier, most of the time.

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  40. Really? I've actually never heard this. Interesting.

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  41. Huh, okay, I'll give this some though. We have actually done a few 'office olympics' before, that'd probably be really fun to share. We did things like shoot water from an ink syringe into an ink sample (from a foot away), guess how many ink samples are in one bin, guess what pen is handed to you while blindfolded, that kind of stuff :)

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  42. Thank you for pointing that out! My mistake :) I'll add an annotation to the video to correct this.

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  43. Oh yeah, ink definitely stains unfinished wood! I have an old picture of it here, it's kind of covered in junk but you can definitely see the ink stains! This was after we stopped using it for ink sampling.

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  44. Hmm...thought I uploaded it, let's try again.

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  45. I'm not seeing it, dang. Dunno what's up with that.

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  46. I'll give this some thought. I've shied away from doing something like this because I really don't want to encourage or promote swapping against the wishes of the manufacturers I represent. They understand the appeal of nib swapping but you can imagine they don't want to have to wrestle with warranty issues stemming from people dismantling their own pens. With proper disclaimers it could be done tastefully, I'll look into it.

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  47. That's right, really anything that won't interact with the ink would work.

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  48. Yeah, except I have something like 150 pens I need to organize, maybe more I don't even know. I have a slew of cheaper pens that are just in bins and rolls that I need to count up.

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  49. The man making them essentially stopped doing it. He gave the ink a year full-time, but has a young family to support so he went into teaching (Chemistry, I believe).

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  50. Awesome! Thanks for the compliments, I'm so glad to provide the 101 series. Man, if only I'd had it all laid out like that so clearly for me when I got into this hobby/obsession ;)

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  51. Any brand you see on our site, we are authorized retailers for and have access to the full line (or at least what's within the US). That includes also Omas, Aurora, Montegrappa, Namiki, Waterman, Parker, Caran d'Ache, etc. ;)

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  52. Great! Of course that was a couple of years ago (and about 60lbs ago) and I'd totally do a better job of it now, but the information is still solid and has surely helped a lot of folks wrap their heads around this whole FP thing ;) I'm glad to have helped you out Stephanie!

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  53. I think 'huge' is a relative term. There aren't that many talented nib makers around any more, it's really a lost craft. I'm sure supply is partly an issue, but most of it has to be the fact that companies don't understand what demand there is. Noodler's has sold many, many flex pens (granted, the low price helps a lot with that), and will perhaps prove that demand is there. But keep in mind, fountain pens in general have to be less than 1% of all pens bought and sold, and probably 1% of those are flex pens, if that. The demand is really quite small when you take R&D, mass production setup costs, and distribution/education for flex nibs. In our little online fountain pen world it seems so obvious that flex nibs would sell, but in the 'real world', it's still practically unknown.

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  54. The Prima nib will come out, but it can be tough. What helps is to try to pull out just the nib (not the feed), by rocking it side to side as you are pulling it out of the pen. Is yours a black nib? these seem to be just a little tougher to remove, but I promise, it'll come out.

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  55. haha, we've talked about doing funny swag like this. It's amazing how many innuendoes you can come up with around FP terminology ;)

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  56. Awesome. Thank you.

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  57. Yes.

    The full caveat of, 'Will negate manufacturer warranty' is understood

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  58. It is always a little bit of a bummer when one's choices are reduced, but with the way you guys do business, and the total openness you display, it's easy to support your decision. You have a loyal customer base because it's really clear you care about your customers, to the point of ending up with tons of nibs trying to please them! :) Thanks for letting us know what's going on, as always. It's a pleasure to contribute to the success of companies who do business the RIGHT way!

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  59. You were the trail blazer! Thinking outside the box, and we appreciate that.

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  60. Fortunately i have decided to give up on trying to use a stub. I write too fast to get any benefit from them. When are we going to hear about the summer Edison?

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  61. Great news that I can buy a set of Lamy italic nibs. Only wish they were in black for my Charcoal Safari.

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  62. Thanks, I suppose they do have all that information. Love your company, and the bookmarks!

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  63. I hope that it is not too late to comment on this topic/pen.

    I have purchased two of these pens in the last two years. One was a gift. The recipient was quite pleased.

    I use mine frequently and have not found it to be too heavy, nor has it leaked. I have not noticed any problems with drying out, even after sitting for several days to a week.

    I do not post any of my pens, so I do not know how it would feel posted. I must admit that I prefer a heavier pen, but have had to get used to using the lighter ones, since many of the higher end pens are so light.

    I would recommend this pen for beginners as well as those who know fountain pens. It is great as an EDC and gets a glance and a nod whenever I use it in a group for the first time.

    I am considering getting a couple more as gifts this year. Glad that they are available through Goulet pens now.

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