Graf von Faber-Castell Cobalt Blue: Ink Review

Graf von Faber-Castell Cobalt Blue: Ink Review

Are you ready for some Inky goodness?

Hey guys, Jenni here and this week I am reviewing the deep, rich and beautiful Faber-Castell Cobalt Blue. I used this ink in my most recent Monday Matchup and absolutely fell in love with so many things about it. Not only is this color the perfect hue of blue, but it also surprises you with purple and red hues when water is applied to it. This makes it the perfect match for the Noodler’s Tinian Treasure fountain pen. I’m sure by now you are asking yourself, “Can it be used in everyday writing?” and “How will it write inside my everyday carry notebook?” Let me assure you, this ink will not disappoint. Get ready to be introduced to your new favorite blue ink: Faber-Castell Cobalt Blue.

Graf von Faber-Castell Cobalt Blue: Ink Review
Graf von Faber-Castell Cobalt Blue Ink Review
Supplies Used:

Smear Test (Dry Time):

  • Medium– This ink isn’t necessarily a fast drying ink, it took around 25 seconds to dry. But it definitely dried fast enough for sketching and drawing without smearing everything around the page. 

Drip Test (Water Resistance):

  • Low– When water is applied to this ink magic happens! Yes, the blue disappears making it not super water resistant, BUT what you get left behind with is a beautiful mix of purple and red hues that are gorgeous and perfect for art.  

Saturation:

  • Medium– This ink has a whole lot of pigment to it but I wouldn’t consider it a highly saturated ink. It is a deep, dark blue but it only gets slightly darker the more ink you apply to the paper. It does however, leave behind a beautiful red sheen that totally makes up for it. 

Ease of Cleaning:

  • Medium– Cleaning this ink can be easy since it has a low water resistance. However, because the ink mixes with water to produce purple and red hues, it can lead to the staining of your pen and/or converter. Keep that in mind when leaving your pen inked up for a long amounts of time. 

Shading:

  • Low– Unfortunately you don’t get to see too much shading with this ink because it has a medium saturation. You can see a little bit of color variation every now and again, but overall the ink color is pretty consistent, which for me is fine because I LOVE the color!

Flow:

  • Medium– This is a fairly dry, but great flowing ink. When writing with both the Lamy Al-Star and the Noodler’s Konrad I found that there was a bit of hard starting and skipping. Once the feed of the pen was full of the ink, it wrote smooth and without issue. I’d recommend using this ink with a wet writing pen for best results. 

Packaging and Aesthetics:

  • 75ml glass bottle with 2ml ink samples also available.  
  • Gorgeous medium sized bottle that sits wide and low. 
  • Shallow bottle could make filling difficult when ink gets low. You may need to tilt the bottle to get the best results.
Graf von Faber-Castell Cobalt Blue Ink Review

 Inks Similar in Color:


Summary:

I haven’t gotten the chance to try out many Faber-Castell inks but after using Cobalt Blue I have no doubt that I will be trying out more. This ink is great for everyday writing at work, home, in the art studio and beyond. Just make sure you are using it in the right wet writing pen for maximum enjoyment. Also, be sure to try adding a little water to the mix to see what kinds of purple and red hues you can get out of it.

Graf von Faber-Castell Cobalt Blue Ink Review

You can find Faber-Castell Cobalt Blue at Gouletpens.com in a 75ml bottle for $30, a box of 6 cartridges for $3.50, or a 2ml ink sample for $1.50. Have you fallen in love with this beautiful blue yet? If not, please give it a try because it will most definitely surprise you.

What other inks have you been surprised by?

Write on,
Jenni

2017-10-11T14:37:54+00:00 February 11th, 2016|Ink Reviews|4 Comments
  • Kathy

    I love this Cobalt Blue ink, easily one of my favorite blue inks.

  • Another Pen Nut

    Hi Jenni. You write: “This ink has a whole lot of pigment to it.” Is it actually a pigmented ink, or dye-based? Thanks.